Eating Can Be Tricky – I-ASC The Experts

July 2022 – Eating a variety of foods is tricky for many spellers.  What is your experience and advice?

Another installment of our monthly blog feature, “I-ASC(I Ask) the Experts”. Our goal is to turn over some of the most frequently asked questions or issues to the true subject matter experts – the spellers!

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity“The attitude in spellers’ lack of interest in a variety of food does not stem from stubbornness or lack of interest. It begins with the autistic hypersensitivity which can limit the diversity in the foods we choose to eat. Texture, smell, and taste all play a part in the foods we like and dislike. Trying new foods is never easy and it’s aversive enforcing this issue. Like with all learning one must have patience. In time our palates can change and we may become more comfortable with food diversity.”  
~
Tejas Rao Sankar

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity“Oh, that’s tricky. It requires a lot of persistence. Start out with small chunks of food and work your way up.”
~
Brian Foti, Pennsylvania

 

 

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity“First, make it a formal goal for yourself. Then you add some parents who are great motor detectives and coaches. Then persist and persist and persist. Having some grandparents who will take you out to fancy lunches to practice provides really great incentive.”
~
Isaiah Tien Grewal, Canada

 

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity“Low proof of mindfulness always prevents quality eating trials. Getting to try new foods is really hard so I need to have support to stay low and cool. New foods make me so nervous that no way can I try it.”
~J., Florida

 

 

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity“Food Is One Of My Greatest Pleasures In Life. Over The Years I Have Struggled Introducing Some Things But It Is Always Worth It. My Advice Is To Shoot For The Stars But Accept That It Is Best To Approach Any New Food With Small Achievable Goals, It Is Ok To Take Baby Steps.”
~Shane Alvado – Tampa, Florida

 

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity“For me, it’s a sensory thing. I don’t like how certain textures feel in my mouth, it’s like a hypersensitivity. I have to eat it multiple times to get used to it. Sometimes my body won’t allow me to eat it. This struggle can cause dysregulation. My body is pretty set in its ways. So it takes a long time to break out of old loops. Try to make new food fun, make a face or shapes of food. Include colour and coach the body. Also, let them play with the food, it takes the pressure off eating.”  
~Tumelo, South Africa

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity“Eating Has Always Been A Loop-Filled Challenge For Me. Meals Take Up Way Too Many Minutes Of My Day. I Think Setting Goals For My Eating Time Would Be Beneficial.”
~
Jonathan Mages- Orlando Florida

 

 

The mission of I-ASC is to advance communication access for nonspeaking individuals globally through trainingeducationadvocacy, and research.  I-ASC supports all forms of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) with a focus on methods of spelling and typing. I-ASC currently offers Practitioner training in Spelling to Communicate (S2C)with the hope that other methods of AAC using spelling or typing will join our association

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