Letterboard Etiquette – I-ASC the Experts

April 2022 – Imagine I-ASC is putting together a book on letterboard etiquette – what do they need to include?

Another installment of our monthly blog feature, “I-ASC(I Ask) the Experts”. Our goal is to turn over some of the most frequently asked questions or issues to the true subject matter experts – the spellers!

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity

“The most important thing is personal space when watching a speller. In one example of what not to do, l once had someone I’d just met lean on me as I was trying to spell with my mom. There were plenty of seats, so no reason to sit right on top of me.  And then she yelled at me when I became too dysregulated to reply. She’s lucky I couldn’t control my mouth or my finger, because what I was thinking is not most polite. I eventually forgave her, but would never again want to spell in her presence.”

~Sofi, Seattle

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity

“Letterboard etiquette means that the CRP is presuming competence right from the start of our relationship. Without it, the rest of their etiquette doesn’t matter. The right foundational manners include confidence, never-ending patience, and a calm demeanor. The desire to keep learning and adjusting is necessary as well. If all that is in place then we can focus on the technical things. Consistency of board placement, using appropriate prompts at appropriate times, and helping our bodies stay regulated are included in the technical etiquette.”

~Mike Saucedo, Virginia

“The most important thing is to talk to me like I am intelligent. That means not using third person, not using a baby voice, and not using the royal we. No, we won’t keep our hands quiet. Talk to me like you would anyone else. I don’t mind people interrupting if they know what I am saying. Just be careful that you really do know for sure. Have respect for the speller.”

~Logan Harnisher, Clifton Park, New York.

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity

“The letterboard is a key factor in articulating expressive communication. As with all etiquette, there are established rules that must be considered. First, the letterboard should be respectively handled by someone trained in the S2C method. Second, there is a selective process and prerequisite skills that should be acquired before beginning work on the letter board. Be sure to follow the progression of stencils and prompting supports before moving forward. Finally, be patient yet persistent. There is still much motor effort involved on behalf of the speller as well as concentration. Responding on the letterboard openly takes time and determination.”

~William, New York

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity

“My number one tip for letterboard etiquette is to not talk while a speller is spelling out their answer to your question. Think of it as talking over someone trying to tell you something. Let the speller finish working on their answer.”  

~Samantha, New Jersey

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity

“There are many tips that can help spellers reach fluency much sooner than later. It is best to keep the board as steady as possible with every session. Remember to respect the process, rushing to open only hinders our special bond we are hoping to form. Stick with the plan and always come regulated with a clear mind.”  

~Anshil Kumar,  Florida

S2C, Spelling to Communicate, nonspeaking, nonspeakers, Autism, I-ASC, Speller, nonverbal, S2C, Spellebrity“First of all, you need to know what you are doing. Master the basics like placement and grip. Know how to talk and coach my motor. Don’t forget I am a person too. Be strict with my body but understanding with my difficulties. Learn your speller.

It’s also like being in a job environment. Focus all your attention on me. Be prepared and know what you are doing, especially if you still need to teach someone the skills to spell. Be kind but firm. Keep believing in their skills because I know they have lost their ability in believing they can do this multiple times.”

~Kieran Pillay, South Africa

 

The mission of I-ASC is to advance communication access for nonspeaking individuals globally through trainingeducationadvocacy, and research.  I-ASC supports all forms of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) with a focus on methods of spelling and typing. I-ASC currently offers Practitioner training in Spelling to Communicate (S2C)with the hope that other methods of AAC using spelling or typing will join our association

 

Posted By on Wednesday, April 27th, 2022 in Advocacy,Community,I-ASC THE EXPERTS,Nonspeakers,S2C,Spelling to Communicate

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